The Square
News and perspectives from Covia.

Most of this article as well as the accompanying image originally appeared in the Spring Lake Village resident newsletter for January 2021. Shared with permission.

Spring Lake Village residents responded to the challenge from the Outreach Committee in December to support The Living Room with generous contributions of $28,500.

The Spring Lake Village Outreach Committee started 20 years ago in 2001 with the mission to support charitable activities in the Sonoma County community through direct services and fundraising. The committee limits annual fundraisers to three per year. In 2020, residents focused on the specific needs of housing (raising money for Habitat for Humanity, Sonoma County), childhood education (the Head Start program in Sonoma County), and hunger and homelessness (The Living Room).

When the pandemic hit, The Living Room, a non-profit organization dedicated to helping women and children who are homeless or at-risk of becoming homeless, transitioned to a crisis center. The SLV donations will be used to provide hot take-out meals at a pick-up window, taking meals into community shelters, and providing information services to women and children in need of help in Sonoma County.

All of these services are provided in a manner that strictly observes social distancing and minimizes exposure to the volunteers and those in need in these vulnerable times. “We are overcome with the generosity of Spring Lake Village residents,” writes Director Rebecca Rogoway. “Thank you all, each and every one of you.”

 

Maintaining a healthy diet can be challenging, but Covia is making it easier for over 1,500 seniors each week across the Bay Area. Through the Market Day program, Covia Community Services provides 19 produce markets from Sonoma County to Monterey that provide seniors with fresh fruits and vegetables at wholesale prices. The markets, run primarily by senior volunteers, also offer a convivial gathering, often incorporating information, tastings and music.

Nearly 25,000 pounds of produce pass through the markets each year, 20% of it donated by local businesses and growers. More than just providing nutritious food at a reasonable price, these markets foster community by giving seniors a great reason to get together with friends. Volunteers and shoppers share conversation, enjoy coffee and pastries, and listen to music at locations ranging from senior housing communities (including Covia Affordable Communities) to senior centers and churches.

A new Market Day is opening on Thursday, May 23 at the Yu-Ai-Kai Japanese-American Community Senior Service Center, located in San Jose’s historic Japantown. The market will be open from 10:30 – 11:30 am, and will be hosted on the 4th Friday of each month.  

Market Day is one of Covia’s fastest growing Community Services programs. Two new markets opened in 2018, one at Stevenson House in Palo Alto and one at the Walnut Creek Senior Center. Two more new sites are planned in 2019:  Emerson Village in Pomona (the first Market Day site in Southern California), and Shires Memorial, which became a Covia Affordable Community in 2018. New sites are also being explored in Marin, Sonoma and Los Angeles counties.

In Marin, the Community Services team is piloting a program at Market Day in Novato, helping low-income seniors sign up for and use Cal Fresh, a benefit that helps stretch grocery dollars. Covia Community Services is exploring plans to expand this service to other locations.

Each Market Day is unique, operated by local volunteers and offering a variety of services or activities. Some offer recipes while highlighting the health benefits of certain vegetables. Others provide music from local musicians, seasonal produce tastings or an informal lunch.

Stoneman Village, an affordable senior housing community in Pittsburg, wanted to provide fresh produce to all its residents, including those who are homebound. All it took was a plan and Gail Kellough, an outstanding volunteer. Volunteers shop for and deliver bags of produce from Market Day to their neighbors who are unable to get out and shop on their own.

Says Colleen Chavez, Covia Market Day Program Director:“I never tire of seeing the positive effect of each Market Day: the joy of seniors coming together, helping one another, having access to such great produce, and being part of the community.”

This story was originally printed in Community Matters

The Covia Foundation recently announced the recipients of the 2018 Darby Betts grant funds.

Established in 2005 as a partnership between Covia and the Episcopal Diocese of California, the Darby Betts fund supports services and programs that benefit seniors in the Episcopal Dioceses of California, Northern California, and El Camino Real.

In 2018, the fund was able to disburse $71,000 among 15 organizations, with grant amounts ranging from $2,500 to $10,000.

Grant recipients and programs for 2018 are:

Father Darby Betts was the visionary behind the Covia communities and services that serve seniors, wherever they call home. To qualify for the Darby Betts grant, organizations must operate on a nonprofit basis and demonstrate a clear and dedicated focus on services and programs that benefit older adults living throughout the region covered by the three Episcopal Dioceses in Northern California – from its northern border down to San Luis Obispo. The grants are determined by a committee of representatives from the Episcopal Impact Fund and Covia.